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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 124 (some duplicates have been removed)
, not so many times, but the last one i was here, and that was because a pope died. john paul ii died after living his last years infirmed and in visible pain. now we have a transition, we have a living pope. you're not watching a funeral before the next pope is elected. you're not watching the world's heads of state come here to pay their respects to the departed pope. you're seeing a much different kind of transition. john al whlen, what is pope benedict going to do the rest of the day? >> normally the wednesday audience, the pope gives religious instruction rooted in scripture. but today i would imagine that knowing the momentous nature of what's happening, it's probably going to be uncharacteristically personal for benedict. i will imagine he will talk about what was in his mind and in his heart as he reached this remarkable decision to step as sight and what his hopes for the church are going forward. >> and high school a moment of opportunity and possibility, many saying this needs to be a moment for reform. what kind of reform do you think needs to happen? of course in our minds are
, that has pope john paul ii blesses want faithful from his window. for the first time since announcing his resignation. a crowd of 50,000 fill would st. peter's square 11 days before the pope is stepping down. meanwhile the cardinals are areiching in rome to lobby for the next pope of the church. pastor of our lady. monsingor always good to see you. >> good to be with you, too. >> what direction will the church go and who will the cardinals pick? >> i think we have a couplele of issuings facing us. the need for a strong organizational leadership in rome. between the aging of john paul ii and a pope in the late cents and 80s and admits he's slowing down, a lot has been let g. we need a strong letter in rome and be directive . someone with john paul roim two's charis mareach out to the third world and europe and america where we have lost many, many catholics. i hope we have someone with a new vibrant vision and someone from the third world who puts us in church with want major i wanty of catholics in central and south america. >> there is it a discussion that the new pontiff could be from a
hagel gets blocked at least for now. rand paul and others are threatening to block john brennan. susan rice didn't get to the nomination process. is this rocky road if that's how we want to describe it, david, does this hurt the president's credibility or at least his ability to get things done, a small distraction, should it become a smaller one? put it into the wider con tech in terms of what the white house want to be accomplishing right now. >> it does take away according to past presidents, national security is where one says the president says it's a precedent to do this. it's a time that we have a lot of things going on in terms of the president's foreign policy, particularly in the middle east and withdraw in afghanistan coming to the fore and you need someone in the pentagon doing this. it can be seen as a nuisance in that the president want to be talking about his agenda, which is the gun control, immigration, things that people can get done. you have, of course, this sequester and the ongoing issue of the spending situation and taxes. so i think these are the things that the
that this pope hasn't done or even pope john paul ii that can change that perception? >> sure. i think that this pope certainly has had a papacy plagued with scandal and i think that was a clear signal to the next pope that their key task will be healing those divisions and that's going to come with more transparency and certainly transformation in our church. >> sister louise acres is a members of the sisters of charity. she was here on "jansing & co." yesterday. here's what she had to say about women in the church. >> i think the catholic church, the roman catholic church is probably one of the last bastians of sexism. i think there's a growing resistance to the status quo today and a growing movement to suggest changes. >> the sister went on to say that women in the priesthood could be one possible solution and i'm wondering what your reaction is to those comments? >> absolutely. i think it's one component of the transformation we need to see. but we can't just add women in stir, right? we need to fully transform our church, look at those policies and practices that we have that are
step down. it's something that nobody's even considered in modern times. even john paul 2 who was much more ill or much more tired looking and ill, of course. he was very ill than pope benedict xvi looks and he said i had enough of this and just going to retire and read and live a spiritual life until the end and leave it with somebody younger and stamina. who that guy or pope will be, we don't know yet. we'll know soon. >> all right. thank you very much, claudio. let's bring in nbc news vatican analyst george wigle and father thomas at georgetown university. gentlemen, thank you so much for joining us. george, you have been on air all pretty much throughout the day. your initial reaction to this news, especially knowing what the pope said two years ago? >> i wasn't surprised at the fact, tamron. but i was a little surprised at the timing but the more i think about it during the day, the fact that the pope has done this in such a way that the college of cardinals will be meeting during lent, a traditional season of reflection, self examination, examination of conscious, if you will. in
benedict who stepped in and became pope after pope john paul ii, the iconic pope of the 20th century, stepped down. of course, pope john paul ii had been pope since 1979. and so, of course, his impact felt not only in the religious world but also the political world. pope benedict, though, never really, of course, given the chance to emerge from the shadows. and it seems that for a good bit of his time, he was dogged by allegations that came through the child abuse scandal throughout certainly before his reign. he was constantly being dogged by questions regarding that. but mark halperin, an iconic figure replaced by pope benedict who has had a very short tenure and now is stepping down in a way that a lot of popes don't step down before they die. >> short tenure, and it's going to be scrutinized for some of the issues you raised. to me now thinking forward, it's going to be a very big story for catholics and others around the world including the question of will it be another european? there's going to be pressure to look to another region of the country as there was last time. i th
was elected as a caretaker pope. following john paul ii. that was a hard act to follow. they were looking for an elderly pontiff who would not be in position for that long and also there was no way anybody was going to top john paul ii in terms of charisma, in reaching out to the young, and, unfortunately, they didn't get a salgzman for catholicism in this particular pope, which will be a very important ingredient for the next one. >> he also had the burdens of dealing with the scandals after 27 years of john paul ii. he had to focus on the apology, the fact that he had actually met individually in his role as cardinal ratzinger investigating some of the problems of the abuse in the american church. >> he did go some way in terms of, you know, issuing an apology from the pope as a pretty lofty ideal, but, many of the, we still have a problem, many of the, worldwide with the sex scandal and the catholic church. they haven't addressed it at all levels. the vatican can pools. they can set lawsuits. there are a lot of damaged people out there who were basically abused as children, and no matt
for the funeral of john paul back in 2005. that was a funeral and this is a different time in the church. the pope is driving through st. peter's square to wave to the faithful. he will have another meeting with cardinals in the morning. he will be speaking to his -- to the people that will select a successor. this is the last time that the pope will have such direct contact with the people. he is driving around among the crowd. a little earlier, the last speech that he will make in front of the people. many issues, he talked about truth. that is interesting when we consider all the things that have been coming out of the vatican and how many people suspect the pope is standing down because he is not strong enough to get a handle all the things happening within the vatican. let's speak to our resident vatican experts. you're listening to that speech about half an hour ago. what did you think were the most notable passages? >> it is importance -- it is important the weight of the papacy. >> there was one bed where he mentioned the dual role of the -- one bit worried mentions the dual role of the po
john paul or this pope -- is there any sense of appetite given these issues that are, you no, tearing apart the church in many ways, that there's going to be change. there a mandate for the new pope to do something that will be meaningful and effective? >> well, michael, actually, to be honest, it's not just most it is all of the 115 cardinals who will vote in the conclave who are were appointed by john paul ii or pope benedict xvi. the things like ordination of women in the priesthood, i do not believe it's realistic to think that whoever emerges from the sistine chapel is the next pope of the catholic church is going to overturn church teachings on those points. i do think what is perhaps not only realistic, but quite probable, is that one thing that is very much going to be on the minds of the cardinals who are electing the next pope, whatever else they do, it is critical to make sure whoever they pick has a profile of having clean hands on the crisis, that is, he has to come across as part of the solution to this crisis rather than part of the problem. >> john, thanks so much for
at the vatican. pope benedict carries the stigma of not being as popular as his predecessor, john paul ii. the monsignor of the shrine in washington puts it in perspective. >> christ was controversial. the things that jesus did. the way that he reached out to people. the way he talked to people. the types of people he talked to. it upsettle, many people. >> reporter: and tom roberts points out that pope benedict will be remembered as well for doing more to actually address the abuse scandal than his predecessor john paul ii ever did. wolf. >> as you know, pope benedict was also involved in a controversy in the united states over the actions of some american nuns. remind our viewers about this. >> reporter: that's right, not long ago, some american nuns challenged the church's teachings on home sexuality, on the male only priesthood. they supported obama's health care plan when the church spoke out against it. these nuns ended up being reprimanded. the nuns got a lot of support within the united states for their actions. it was controversial for the pope. he was also prompted to do that by
is going to resign his position. the end of the month. and, you know, he succeeded john paul ii who has rushed to make a saint. wrongly so, i think. not that he doesn't deserve it. you need some time. also the pope has said this is not the first -- not the first pope to retire. popes can retire. we are used to popes dying in. right? and most of them have. but a little quick research as we were getting ready to come on the air which is why i am not fully in uniform yet this morning. i will take care of this right now, the last pope i could find to resign was pope gregory xii. >> i don't remember him. >> bill: you wouldn't. back in the 15th century around 1415 or so there have been maybe a half a dozen popes to resign. he is the last one i could find. >> wow. >> yeah. there are a lot of explanations out there on twitter, supposedly for the vatican sort of indirectly saying it's for health reasons. he doesn't have the strength to serve in this role any more. so we don't know exactly what that means. there were rumors when he would resign when his butler wa
to function. even john john paul ii. what is it about this pope that he decided to step down? >> i think there are a couple of things going on there. with john paul ii he knew he was dying. i don't think benedict is so seriously ill that he's going to die but he could -- you know, live for another 10 years. he's got an older brother. and being in the papacy and not to be up for the job. so i think he decided that it was best for the church to go at this point and let someone else carry the burden. >> bill: now as "the new york times" says, the church is at a crossroads in the sense that where the church used to be strong, it is not so much anymore and it is in a developing world in africa and in south america and in asia where the church is showing great growth. what does that say about a future pope? >> well, there's two theories here. one is you go and find somebody from africa where the church is truly growing. on the other hand, the other theory is no, you look for someone who can deal with the problems of the church, where it has real big problems, namely europe where it is in decli
to meet the pope then john paul the 2nd. then what happened happened and my mother found herself representing bill clinton to the pope. >> how exciting for her. >> it was a challenge. >> i guess it was. >> e.j. this morning quotes somebody who says the most noted earnize i earnizing -- modernizing thing this pope did was to retire, get out of the way. could it be at this modern age a pope just can't afford to be seen frail and weakened in the 24/7 news cycle? are we moving beyond the days? >> i don't think that's necessarily true. john paul felt strongly he wanted the world to see him in a sickened state because that was humanity. that he was setting an example of someone who was frail and feeble and carrying on. i think this pope, you know, has decided to set a different example. we'll see what this precedent means. does it mean future popes have to be pushed out? does he have influence after a new pope is manamed? we're in unchartered waters. >> and in quite a while, we'll see -- >> they have their own camp david. >> with the choicloisted nuns. they'll probably get better food.
pope john paul
of pope benedict and some of the charisma of pope john paul ii. >> reporter: in the murky world of vatican politics, no clear front-winner to replace benedict has emerged. a church which has come to see its future more and more in the developing world will have to to decide whether its next leader should be from there.eade cardinal peter turkson of ghana is a campaigner for social a reform and is often cited as the leading african candidate. but the 64-year-old has already stumbled on the issue of the church's relations with islam and is seen as a risky choice. the highest profile potential candidate from latin america may be the 63-year-old archbishop of sao paolo, brazil, cardinal odilio pedro scherer, but the church has yet to demonstrate it's ready for a south american pope and he's thought to be a long shot. there are long odds as well for cardinal timothy dolan archbishop of new york. but any american candidate wouldic have to overcome the church'srcom traditional reluctance to elect a superpower pope. if the church reverts to anrc italian, cardinal anglo scola, 71-year-old archbisho
to do that. and that's why i think this particular move, very counterproductive. >> senators john paul and john mccain slammed the white house allegedly for leaking the plan on purpose. >> this is the prosecutor pea doing his own plan. it shows me he's really not serious. when they come out and say my way or the highway and if congress doesn't ask be with i'll put it on the desk and say pass it now, that's no way to get it done. but it seems to me to show the president really doesn't want immigration reform. >> leaks don't happen in washington by accident. this races the question that many of us continue to wonder about. does the president really want a result or does he want another reason to beat up republicans so he can get political advantage in the next election? >> he argued the white house plan and bipartisan negotiations shared some key elements. >> republican, this was leaked. it's also clear that it's incomplete. there's a silver lining in this which is that there are a lot of co commonalities between the two plans. >> was this intention by the white house to pressure congres
choice is experiencing and bring those numbers back up? >> it's a very good question, both john paul ii and benedict xvi spent enormous energies trying to reevangelize europe. and the effects have been minute natural so far. one has to hope that europe facing a very bleak demographic future itself, i mean europe is depopulating itself at a rate unheard of in human history. will eventually suggest to europeans that the sole wiltering secularism in which they have been stuing themselves for the past several generations has no future quite literally. it would be very helpful if the next pope is a man who had come from a background who has faced down and successfully met the challenge of aggressive seg larism. >> merge catholicism is experiencing something of an identity crisis, catholics now have twice voted for a president who one might consider to be the most liberal on right to life issues that we have ever had. is that catholic identity crisis in the united states of kern to the vatican? >> it should be of concern to everyone, although i would underscore that catholics who are regularl
from a historical context. we need to update this law in this part of it is no longer needed." >> john paul stevens said in a supreme court decision that the plaintiffs had failed to make the case that this voter id law is one to be a hindrance or impediment to anyone voting. and, i might add, when the state of georgia passed their voter id law, we saw in the fact the opposite of what the liberals and civil rights organizations allege. in the state of georgia, we saw black voter participation increase after the state of georgia passed their voter id law. these two examples are in direct conflict with what people like hilary shelton of the naacp argue, the leadership conference on civil rights, aclu, lead of voters -- all of these groups allege that voter id is going to be an impediment for people to go out and vote. minorities, in particular. elderly. that is just not the case. >> that is cherylyn harley lebon of project 21. >> this is the situation. she needs to get down in the weeds in she's going to talk about the issues. she was talking about georgia. because of our effort, it is t
succeed pope john paul ii. >> joining us is from the school of law. >> glad to be with you. >> one of my first questions, we think about the catholic church, it's been underfire and i know that you are very concerned about the moral decline of the world in general. so, when you think about the next pope, you've got to have to have somebody who will adapt and adhere to the catholic belief system. >> that's right, and i'm confident that the conclave will pick someone like that, an extremely good successor not just to benedict, but john paul iv. ap they had the history, the back-to-back, and i think there are a lot of cardinals out there who could fill those shoes. >> since you have an accurate track record of predicting the next pope, who is in the running? >> well, i'm not sure that i actually predicted it. i hoped that he would be the choice. and-- >> that's close enough. >> i don't know. you know, at this point, i don't think there's any front runner, and i think it is really impossible to predict who it's going to be. but, obviously, you have your favorites choices. i think that las ve
the last several years of pope john paul's papacy. the poor man was so wracked with illness and kept on coming out in an ever more frail state. he hasn't canceled any engagements. we're hearing rumors that he decided no more transatlantaic travel after trips to south america. the word we're hearing is fatigue. we're going to hear conspiracy theories ranging from everything to the vatican bank to the horrible sexual scandals. pope gregory in the 1400s was forced out. it wasn't volunteer. it was like a much more pleasant version of what happened to an curry. the last time this happened was back in the 1200s so almost 700 years since this has been done voluntarily. it's really, really a shock. this had guy has always been renowned for his command of power within the vatican walls. >> listening to everything you're saying and the history there, there's got to be more behind this. it's just not a job people and you can away from, and as history has shown us, i know there are conspiracies and all. what do you think is the reason he is leaving now? >> i wouldn't want to speculate. we'll hea
at the time of pope john paul ii's ilniz. and i think it's much more important to have a vital individual there to carry on as pope, so i think the pope made what i think will now be a precedent-setting decision. >> i think there's no doubt in that. with the advances in medical technology, if they could continue to essentially live out their lives as pope. so somebody we'll be discussing in the coming days. i want to switch gears and talk about the state of the union. glen rush from politico writing that it will be less of a olive branch. if that's the strategy, what do you think of it? do you think it's the time what most americans seen -- the time is right for the president to push hard? >> well, you know, they always ask the question, the state of the union is, fill in the blank. i think the state of the union is strong, but the state of economy is weak. we have too many people looking for jobs and too many people who have given up looking for jobs. he never menned -- so let's get together, put people back to work. he can approve the pipeline and the other is to approve free trade with
. john boehner, eric cantor, and paul ryan, and paul ryan and cantor are going to keep boehner to the right. i mean, cantor and ryan's advisors have told us privately there is no opening for tax revenue in this deal at all. i'm want sure if john boehner would do it independently of them, but the people that we've seen who have been completely ineffective are the people on the house armed services committee, the people who make these decisions usually, but the chairman has not been able to sway boehner at all. we've seen the stalemate because of that, and cantor and rooen are going to keep boehner on the right. >> people outside the process are saying this is the dumbest way to do business, to have a meat ax approach and have across the board cuts. yes, it does achieve some budget savings, but does it not in any kind of intelligent way of planning. >> which is why if you talk to the people on capitol hill, the people who are making these decisions, they say that down the road if there are huge economic damages -- i mean, we don't really know what's going to happen to the economy
done in 719 years. he has decided to ab -- he was elevated to the papacy after the death of pope john paul ii. news of this is reverb rating around the country and around the world. nearly one quarter of the united states, 74 million americans, are catholic, and worldwide there are 1.1 billion members of the church. >> encompassing a range of issues from contraception to policy. the timing of the announcement comes as a surprise. just two days before ash wednesday, which marks the start of the lentin season, the holyist period on the catholic calendar. joining us from washington, the host of msnbc's "hardball" chris matthews, and contributor and washington post columnist e.j. deon. chris, my colleague, the light in the darkness on many things political. >> right. >> what do you make of this announcement coming as it does two days before ash wednesday? it seems like a major surprise. to what degree do you think the catholic church will seize on this as a moment to pivot? >> you may think so, but i don't think so. i don't think it's going to be a moment of pivot. i think it's probably p
john paul decided that all those cases would now come to his office. so from 2001 to 2005, he saw every case. so he is the most knowledgeable person in the world about these issues. >> so what happened to these cases now? >> it's a very good question. i think it's the fundamental question for the church, because it's clear that these are crimes. they're not since, they're crimes. and they've also been covered up in a rather methodical way by the church around the world. >> your research took almost two years. and in your research, are these isolated incidents or is it habitual within the church? >> i think what you see is obviously not every priest is a pedophile. in fact, they're a rather small percentage of priests. but what you do see is patterns that emerge all over the world. for a long time, the vatican said oh, this was an american problem. but now we see this problem cropping up in australia, in germany, in brussels, in ireland, where it's been huge, in italy. so what you see in these -- you know, what you see is patterns. and the patterns are almost always of cover-up. instead
pope john paul ii. >> do you think this is overshadowed over a time that should be honoring pope benedict? >> yes. i think it is. he's a humble man, a very kind man. if you were to meet him and you're a nobody, he speaks to you as if you're the most important person in the world. he's a very humble world. in his heart, he's a good man. he loves the church and wants the best for the church. think about it. is there anyone in the world who has put down power willingly? >> certainly in this country. when is the conclave going to start? >> probably monday the congregations will begin and shortly there after they will start that conclave. they want a pope by easter. they know the world is watching them. it's important to the church and to the larger world. >> father, great to have you here. >> thank you. appreciate it. >>> that wraps up this hour of "jansing & co." i'm chris can jansing. the usual, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't
for somebody who will continue the intellectual, the pass storm mission of john paul the 2nd and benedict the 16th. who will be in alignment with them and their cardinals from europe, north america, latin america and africa that can do that very well. jenna: like all popes, really in the position of great power. there is also criticism that sometimes is levied upon someone with such a responsibility. i'm just curious when you reflect back over these last several years with pope benedict, what do you think is important when you look ahead to who is chosen for the next pope but not only for the leadership of the church but a religious leader, a spiritual leader for the world? >> i think one of the great challenges is reconciliation among people of different faiths of integrity, of spirituality, of purifying the church. this has been a great concern of pope benedict and i think his successor will be of the same mind, that, the people have to folk discuss on the person of jesus christ as christians, the work of charity and brotherhood. jenna: mr. anderson, so nice of you to join us today. we
. i was here when pope john paul ii died in 2005, and it was completely different atmosphere. on this occasion, very much an opportunity for people, the faithful, to come and contemplate the legacy of pope benedict. many appreciated him as a teacher, a thinker, an intellectual. somebody who had the courage to confront many of the issues that have plagued the church over the last decade or so. the question of, for instance, pedophilia and the priesthood and other things. very much what they heard from people is they appreciated him as someone who faced and grappled with serious issues and appreciated the fact that he had the courage to step down at this point in his life. >> ben wedeman for thus morning. thank you for the update. you can hear them breaking down from the mass said a little bit this morning. here is what will happen from now on from here. pope benedict xvi has amended the conclave law. they don't have to wait for 16 days after the papacy is vacant. cardinals under the age of 80 will take part. four ballots a day. b ballots get counted twice daily. and dark smoke
who will be voting were appointed either by john paul ii or benedict xvi and on the big picture issues they are all of one mind. i think it's quite unlikely the next pope is going to ordain women or repeal church teaching on abortion or gay marriage or those kinds of issues. now on the other hand, i would certainly say from my own experience of talking to cardinals the more thoughtful among them realize the church has a woman's problem. they understand there are a lot of sisters who feel the same way as our guest does and it's not just nuns, lots of women generally feel that way. i think the next pope will face this difficult challenge of trying to reach out to women and assuring them there's a place for them in the church while at the same time drawing a line in the sand on the ordinary nation question. >> when you say that they're going to select the new pope and they're going to think outside the box and they're maybe going to south america or africa to choose the next pope, they're really not thinking outside the box though, are they? maybe they are in picking a pope from another c
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 124 (some duplicates have been removed)